TODAY’S CHURCH – Cathedral of Maringa (Parana, Brazil)

TODAY’S CHURCH – Cathedral of Maringa (Parana, Brazil)

This is a Roman Catholic cathedral located in downtown Maringa, Parana, Brazil, measuring 124 m high. It was completed in 1972 and is the tallest church in South America and the 16th tallest in the world.

Architect José Augusto Bellucci was inspired by the Soviet Sputnik satellites when he projected the modern design with conical shape of the cathedral, which was idealized by the archbishop Dom Jaime Luiz Coelho.

TODAY’S CHURCH – Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira, (Cundinamarca, Colombia)

TODAY’S CHURCH – Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira, (Cundinamarca, Colombia)

Catedral de Sal (Salt Cathedral) in Zipaquira, about 25 miles north of Bogota, is an underground church built in a tunnel of salt mines deep inside a salt mountain. It is built into a space left by salt mining; everything you see here is salt. As you descend into the church, you pass 14 small chapels representing the stations of the suffering of Christ. The sanctuary at the bottom has three sections, representing the birth, life, and death of Jesus.

The first Salt Cathedral was consecrated in 1954, but structural problems and safety concerns led the authorities to shut down the sanctuary in 1990. The current church was built between 1991 and 1996 about 200 feet below the old sanctuary, again using caves left behind by previous mining operations.

TODAY’S CHURCH – Bruder Klaus Chapel (Mechernich, southern Germany)

TODAY’S CHURCH – Bruder Klaus Chapel (Mechernich, southern Germany)

“A concrete chapel on the edge of a field in Mechernich, southern Germany, built by local farmers in honor of their patron saint, the 15th-century hermit Bruder Klaus” according to an icon.

TODAY’S CHURCH – Written Stone (Monastery, Romania)

TODAY’S CHURCH – Written Stone (Monastery, Romania)

Local tradition confesses that, during the construction of a railway, at the opening of a tunnel, it was found an icon painted in stone representing the Holy Trinity. The monastery was built at the opening of the tunnel The monastery was built at the opening of the tunnel on the rock.

TODAY’S CHURCH – Chapel in the Rock (Arizona, USA)

TODAY’S CHURCH – Chapel in the Rock (Arizona, USA)

This fascinating Roman Catholic church is literally built into the rock. The views from outside are unbelievable but the serenity inside is awesome

Some say, that Chapel in the Rock can move even the non-religious.

TODAY’S CHURCH – The Wireman Chapel at Eckerd College (St. Petersburg, Florida, USA)

TODAY’S CHURCH – The Wireman Chapel at Eckerd College (St. Petersburg, Florida, USA)

A kid on the tour to Eckerd College once said it looked like a “Jesus spider from outer space.” Inspired by 20th-century architect Eero Saarinen, the Chapel was designed by the highly respected Chicago architectural firm of Perkins and Will. Its key design features are its octagonal shape and in-the-round seating, the oculus at the center of the roof that directs sunlight to the center of the sanctuary, the lower glass panels which reflect light from the water outside to the interior, and the girders which recall the flying buttresses of the medieval cathedral, instilling a sense of timelessness in a contemporary structure.

TODAY’S CHURCH – Saint-Michel d Aiguilhe chapel (Le Puy-en-Velay, France)

TODAY’S CHURCH – Saint-Michel d Aiguilhe chapel (Le Puy-en-Velay, France)

Perhaps one of the most remarkable sights in France, a chapel perched on a volcanic plug. This is the Rock of Aiguilhe, on the edge of the town of Puy en Velay, in the Auvergne. The Chapelle Saint-Michel has stood there for 1042 years since Bishop Gothescalk had it built in 962 on his return from a pilgrimage to Santiago del Compostella in Galicia. In 1955 workers found relics under the altar that had been there since it was built.

TODAY’S CHURCH – The Hermitage(Island of San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, Spain)

TODAY’S CHURCH – The Hermitage(Island of San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, Spain)

The small church, which is usually closed, dates from the 10th century and seems to have come from the Knights Templar. In the year 1053, it was donated, by Lord of Biscay, to the monastery of San Juan de la near Jaca in Huesca. Medieval burials from the 9th and 12th centuries have been found on the esplanade and in the Hermitage.

In 1593 it was attacked and sacked by Francis Drake. Among other incidents, it has caught fire several times. On November 10, 1978, it was destroyed in one such fire. Two years later, on June 24, 1980, it was re-inaugurated. The hermitage belongs to the parish of San Pelayo in Bakio.

The hermitage also houses various votive offerings from sailors who survived shipwrecks.